Grown Meats

Looking at a recent poll showed that while Baby Boomers who lived the vegan lifestyle was at 2 % Generation X was at 5% and millennials were at 12%, proving that fewer and fewer Americans are consuming animal flesh, animal products, and by-products.

In addition to not eating animals vegans do not use leather for their shoes, jackets, purses, etc. nor do they use any soap, makeup, cleaning product, or item derived from or tested on animals or bugs including honey, wool, down, and silk, etc. It is most often from a compassionate standpoint, while for others it is for the health benefits or both.

As for what vegans eat, I would like to focus today’s blog on two straightforward unprocessed meat alternatives. Go to a place like Trader Joe’s and investigate all the faux meat options they have, it may surprise you. I want to cover two alternatives that you can prepare at home from its natural state and enjoy without too much effort.

Jackfruit is an amazing alternative, grown throughout India and Thailand and the trees grow large with a canopy full of fruit. The fruit itself can range in weight from 35 to 80 pounds. They can be purchased smaller and whole at an Asian market or in the can at those same markets, and they are beginning to carry it at regular grocery stores as well in the can. Ideally get it packed in water or brine. Drain water and slice up the fruit to behave much like a pulled meat and add to any sauce or recipe. Investigate the thousands of recipes online and enjoy!

Jackfruit tree, Opened fruit, fleshy pod with internal nut and BBQ stye

Jackfruit tree, Opened fruit, fleshy pod with internal nut and BBQ stye

Mushrooms are also a great alternative, and they can be portabellas, button mushrooms, and my new favorite is oyster mushrooms. They can be smoked and added to a BBQ sauce or sautéed and treated like meat in your favorite dish. From Indian food, BBQ, and Mexican food they’re my favorite meat replacement. Online find hundreds of recipes for a mushroom-based meal.

Oyster, portobello and button mushrooms

Oyster, portobello and button mushrooms


At the healthy grocery store, you will find dozens of options for alternatives made from processed soybeans like tofu and less processed soybeans making Tempe and from wheat gluten many types of Seitan are available and tasty. Do a Google search, and you will find a myriad of meat-free alternatives.

When I first wrote Nutritional Truths almost two years ago, I was still eating meat but knew the day would come when I would not. It has been over six months ago now since I gave up eating animals and I have not missed it a bit nor do I miss all the internal conflict that had been growing over the past couple years.
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